Lift BIG to get BIG Results

Lift BIG to get BIG results

by Stephen Krzyminski

One of the biggest mistakes I see in most of our clients’ workout programs prior to training at IU Health Sports Performance is the lack of incorporating heavy weight training into their program.  “But I don’t want to get too big and look like a bodybuilder” is, of course, the most common excuse I hear of why they don’t lift heavy weights.  What they don’t realize is that just because they lift heavy doesn’t mean they’re going to “bulk up” like a bodybuilder.

Yes bodybuilders do lift heavy weights, but their overall goal is hypertrophy or an enlargement of the cross-sectional area of the muscle fibers.  There are many other factors that contribute to muscular hypertrophy, such as nutritional intake and timing of that intake, mechanical stress from the weight placed on the muscle, muscle cell hydration, the anabolic hormonal and subsequent receptor response to the training, and the amount of muscular damage that has occurred.

A bodybuilder’s program is typically composed of high volume training that usually consists of 3 or more exercises with multiple sets of 8-12reps and moderate weight resistance per muscle group.  This results in a significant amount of volume and causes increased muscular breakdown that the body adapts to by increasing muscle cross-sectional area, and therefore hypertrophy of the muscle.

By increasing the weight lifted, but keeping the set and rep range low, athletes can keep the overall volume of weight lifted lower.  The benefits of lifting heavier weight, such as increased strength and muscle fiber recruitment, will be evident in your performance with less muscular damage occurring compared to the higher volume protocol.

So if your weight training has become stale and you’re not seeing results don’t be afraid to put more weight on the bar and lift BIG!

Stephen Krzyminski Jr., M.A., C.S.C.S., FMS
Strength and Conditioning Coach
IU Health Sports Performance
1402 Chase Court
Carmel, IN 46032
T: 317-688-5380 C: 989-400-6680
http://www.iuhealth.org/sports-performance

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About Food4Thought

I am no fitness expert. I am simply someone who has found joy in fitness and nutrition. I am a certified group fitness instructor. I’ve been teaching at the local health club for about 3 years now. While Zumba was my first love, I have since added Total Conditioning, Bodyworks plus Abs, and Core to my repertoire of classes. I work with a personal trainer to help me reach my fitness goals that I cannot obtain through group fitness alone. This year I ran my first 5K and plan to run my first 10K in March. To further my knowledge in the fitness realm, I have begun reading Strong Women Stay Slim, New Rules for Lifting Abs, and The Body Sculpting Bible for Women. On my list to read next is Wheat Belly. I am always looking for new ways to further my education and knowledge to better serve the members that take my group fitness classes. Lately, I have started tinkering with recipes, buying healthy cookbooks, and finding easy, tasty, and healthy foods to make. Like I mentioned earlier, I am by no means an expert, but the things I share with you have helped me tremendously with my fitness journey. It is my hope that with these easy tips and recipes, that you too can make these tiny steps and see big positive changes in your life.

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